The Biergarten Embodying the
Bavarian way of life

The Biergarten Embodying the Bavarian way of life

History of the Paulaner Biergarten

The Paulaner Biergarten is much more than a place, it’s a lifestyle. Whether in Munich, London or Shanghai, it stands for enjoyment and conviviality, tradition and friendship. Of course, it’s always informal and casual. In short, it’s where things are exactly as they should be and where Bavaria is the most beautiful – even though some wonderful Paulaner Biergarten lie outside of Bavaria's white and blue borders.

Biergarten have been an inherent part of Bavarian tradition, embodying “Gemütlichkeit“ (hospitality) for over 200 years

The Paulaner Biergarten is much more than a place, it’s a lifestyle. Whether in Munich, London or Shanghai, it stands for enjoyment and conviviality, tradition and friendship. Of course, it’s always informal and casual. In short, it’s where things are exactly as they should be and where Bavaria is the most beautiful – even though some wonderful Paulaner Biergarten lie outside of Bavaria's white and blue borders.

Biergarten have been an inherent part of Bavarian tradition, embodying “Gemütlichkeit“ (hospitality) for over 200 years

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The origin of the Paulaner Biergarten

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Bavarian inventiveness

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Weissbier Moment

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Biergarten quiz

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The origin of the Paulaner Biergarten

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Bavarian inventiveness

weissbier biergarten moment  x

Weissbier Moment

intro v x

Biergarten quiz

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The origin of the Paulaner Biergarten

The origin of the Biergarten dates back to the 16th century in Munich. We owe this heavenly place on earth to the brewing methods of the time and to the Bavarian brewing regulations of 1539 – although both of these almost caused an entire summer without beer in Bavaria. Because at this time beer was brewed using bottom fermentation, which takes place at temperatures between 4° and 8° Celsius, successful fermentation could only occur during the cold months. Furthermore, because the hot brewing kettles had been causing terrible fires in the summer heat, brewing was only permitted between September 29th and April 23rd, as per the historical and traditional brewing regulations at the time. In order to be able to provide beer during Munich’s summer months, beer had to be brewed in the winter, followed by several months of chilled lagering: a true challenge.
As a result, small breweries and inns began to feel robbed of their customers. So they approached King Maximilian, the first King of Bavaria, with their concerns. In 1812, this Wittelsbach King finally declared a compromise – thank goodness – to keep the extremely popular Biergarten in business.

Bavarian inventiveness

Bavarian inventiveness led to the idea of storing beer in deep cellars to keep it cool. These cellars where naturally chilled by gravel spread above ground and shade from chestnut trees planted on top of the cellars. Thanks to their shallow roots, the chestnut trees caused no damage to the cellar vaults and are still a typical feature of Biergarten today. Back then, the brewery sites were located outside the city and quickly became popular destinations for Munich’s citizens. At first, people just picked up the cool, fresh beer to take back home with them, but soon Bavarian hospitality prevailed and the beer began to be enjoyed directly underneath the large treetops of the chestnut trees. The brewers set up simple tables and benches to accommodate the people – the Biergarten was born.

Weissbier Moment

The Biergarten is the best choice for an authentic Bavarian timeout in order to refresh, relax and celebrate. A lush green oasis in the shade of chestnut trees that invites you to stay and decompress Bavarian style with tasty snacks and a well cooled Weissbier. Pouring a Weissbier takes some calm, leisure and intuition to achieve the fluffy foam on top and perfect sparkling pleasure underneath. Then it’s time for the mandatory toasts and you get to enjoy the first taste of Weissbier when it has made its way through the soft froth, making the moment a real, shared Weissbier moment. And that’s when you feel it: The legendary Bavarian gemutlichkeit.

What you've always wanted to know about Biergarten
Equipped with this Biergarten guide, nothing can go wrong.

Beer, the liquid food
In the 14th century the Paulaner monks were brewing true to the motto: “Liquida non frangunt ienum” (“Liquid does not break the Lent”). Because of the hard work and the often sparse food especially at times of fasting, beer was considered liquid food, allowing the people of Munich to drink 5 litres per day!

Beer tables and benches
There are no tables for two, and people are very open. It is appropriate to share a table and toast each other with a Mass (litre mug) of beer.

Dress code
You can wear any outfit to a Biergarten. Of course, true Bavarians like to wear their “Lederne” - the traditional Bavarian Lederhosn and women like to wear their Dirndl, the traditional Bavarian dress, to the Biergarten.

Food
Traditional Biergarten meals are Steckerlfisch, a mackerel on a stick grilled over charcoal. There ist also a Bavarian cheese spread called Obazda, Radi (radish), Wurstsalat (marinated sausage salad) and the traditional Bavarian snack board known in Germany as a “Brotzeitbrettl”.

The toast
Before enjoying a tasty Bavarian wheat beer together, there’s always the toast. But keep in mind: Wheat beer glasses are clinked against each other at the bottom end. That stirs up the yeast that has settled down at the bottom of the glass and allows it to unfold its full range of taste. Also, the glasses are thinner on the upper end and less sturdy than a beer stein.

Biergarten tips
A Biergarten is something unique, hence locals have a slight advantage regarding the local customs and traditions. Thankfully, our waitress Paula has a few tips for your next visit to the Biergarten. Enjoy!

„Bis heut‘ Nachmittag!” See you this afternoon!
It’s best to make appointments for vague times because no one is in a rush and no one is too late. It is very “gemütlich” (relaxed) at a Biergarten and it already begins when making the appointment.

„Hock di hera!“ Have a seat!
Strangers quickly become friends in the shade under the chestnut trees. So please sit down at any table without hesitation. Every new face adds a touch of conviviality.

„Hier schmeckt’s allen!” Everybody likes it here!
The most diverse people come together here: the older gentleman toasts with the young students, the train conductor chats with the tourists, and the bricklayer enjoys his snack with a college professor. This is the right way to socialize.

„Wer bist’n du?“ Who are you?
In a Biergarten sometimes dialects, language, attitude and even competing football fans bump into each other, but fortunately everybody is allowed to say what they think. Only one thing is not allowed: formal introductions in German. In a Biergarten everyone is referred to by their first names, never their last.

„Prost miteinand!“ Cheers everybody!
Don’t forget to toast your neighbors when enjoying your own fresh Paulaner Weißbier, ideally many times. An easy rule of thumb: ten toasts should be okay for each 1 litre Mass. And, by the way, you only toast with the bottom of the Weissbier glass.

„Tischlein deck dich!“ Set your table!
A Bavarian Brotzeit (light meal or hearty snack) is very traditional. As a true Biergarten professional, bring along a quaint tablecloth, wood cutting board and a sharp knife in a picnic basket. A delicious Weissbier will be waiting for you.

„Zeit für a Brotzeit!“ Time for a Brotzeit!
Nothing goes better with a hearty Brotzeit than a fresh Weissbier. Now it’s time to take all the little delicacies we love so much to the Biergarten: namely pretzels, Radi (radish) and our beloved Obatzda.

„Fesches Dirndl!“ Pretty girl!
In Bavaria we use the term, “Fesches Dirndl” to describe a pretty girl, as well as the traditional dress she wears. There is a little secret hiding behind the apron’s tied bow: if the bow is tied on the left it means she is available, but if the bow is tied to the right side, she is already spoken for.

„Aus is!“ It’s over!
Don’t be shocked when you hear the sound of a bell at 10:30 p.m. It would be a shame to spill all that tasty Weissbier. But this means it’s “last call” and is mandated by the opening hours of the Biergarten. Biergarten hours are officially governed by Biergarten regulations, so order your last round punctually!

„Prost Mahlzeit!“ Cheers, enjoy your meal!
Did you know that our Biergarten don’t have a season? Even on a nice day in the winter we will bring out the Biergarten tables and chairs, and enjoy the moment together: with a fresh Weissbier and a homemade picnic lunch.

Bavarian snack board

The Bavarian snack board known in Germany as a “Brotzeitbrettl” is just as much a part of the Paulaner Biergarten as drinking a cold Paulaner beer. To enjoy the perfect snack board at home, watch the video instructions we made for you – it also works great with local foods too.
Enjoy your meal!

The Bavarian snack board known in Germany as a “Brotzeitbrettl” is just as much a part of Paulaner Biergarten as drinking a cold Paulaner beer. To enjoy the perfect snack board at home, watch the video instructions we made for you – it also works great with local foods too.
Enjoy your meal!

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Hefe-Weizen

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Münchner Lager

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Oktoberfest Märzen

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Oktoberfest Bier

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Salvator

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Weizen Radler Non-Alcoholic

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Grapefruit Radler

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