Yeast | Paulaner Brauerei München

Cookies help us in the provision of our services. The Facebook pixels help us improve our marketing activities. By using our services you agree that we may use cookies and Facebook pixels. › Find out moreOK

Previous Yeast Next
"Beer is more than just a drink – it's an elixir of life!" – Christian Dahncke Christian Dahncke
The secret of yeast
The secret of yeast

A few refrigerators, laboratory bottles and worktables – at first glance, the Weihenstephan yeast bank looks like a normal laboratory. "Really, it's a treasure chamber," says Christian Dahncke, Paulaner's head master brewer. Yeast is a deciding factor in the beer’s taste. The Weihenstephan yeast bank guards one of the brewery's most precious treasures: the Paulaner pure-bred yeast. "Its secrets and pure strains have been handed down over centuries," Dahncke says.

» Read more

The treasury of taste
The treasury of taste

"Yeast is just as important to the quality of the beer as hops and malt are," Dahncke explains. He has come to Weihenstephan to pick up fresh cells from the Paulaner strain. The live cells change in every brewing process and have to be regenerated regularly. The Paulaner pure-bred yeast is stored at -112 °F so that its quality always remains the same. "That is the treasury of the Paulaner taste," says Dahncke as he stands in front of the freezer.

» Read more

Tiny cells, big impact
Tiny cells, big impact

The yeast cells are the brewer's best friend because they transform malt sugar into alcohol, carbon dioxide and flavorings during the fermentation process. As if that weren't enough, the hardworking cells also provide a multitude of tastes and smells. "Three hundred in all," says Dahncke. The type is also decisive. As you can tell even from just its name, bottom-fermented yeast settles on the bottom after fermentation. It is ideal for light beer or pilsner. Wheat beer, on the other hand, is brewed with top-fermented yeast, which is driven to the top by the carbon dioxide.

» Read more

About baking and brewing
About baking and brewing

"Today I'll bake, tomorrow I'll brew," sings Rumpelstiltskin in the tale by the Brothers Grimm, hinting at the history of brewer's yeast. "In the Middle Ages, bakers were the best brewers," says Dahncke knowingly. But what no one knew back then was that the yeast cells that circulated in the air of the bakery reacted with the malt sugar during brewing. What once happened by chance is now controlled in a painstaking yeast management system. Otherwise, says Dahncke, "You lose the hops and malt."

» About the master brewer