Fermentation | Paulaner Brauerei München

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Yeast, the transforming miracle
Yeast, the transforming miracle

There is a deep silence in the fermenting room at the Paulaner brewery. Only the sound of chalk against metal tells you that master brewer Eberhard Tischer is at work. He is checking the fermentation process and then noting down the date of his check. The yeast that turns the malt sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide is working away in the classy brewery tanks. "We put our trust in our Paulaner yeast," says Tischer. In spite of this, he has to visit the fermenting room several times during the main fermentation phase in order to check the progress of the fermentation.

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Playing for time
Playing for time

During the fermentation process it looks as if master brewer Tischer has a quiet job. "During fermentation, time really crawls," he says. And that's what has to happen when you use the classic cold fermentation process, as is the case with Paulaner Münchner Hell. "True, it's very time-consuming," explains Tischer, "but it ensures a harmonious beer with a nice head." And in the case of other varieties too, Paulaner relies on time. The master brewers give the beers up to ten days for the fermentation process.

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Quality from a tank
Quality from a tank

One particular characteristic of Paulaner is the way even wheat beer ferments in tanks. "It is a question of quality, and that's something we do not cut corners on," says brewer Tischer. Abandoning  the bottle fermentation guarantees that quality is uniformly high with no fluctuation in flavor. The beer is given enough time to ferment and mature, allowing the flavors to develop to an ideal degree. The temperature is particularly important, and Tischer checks it on an ongoing basis.

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Another way to ferment
Another way to ferment

The alcohol-free wheat beer from Paulaner has a special fermentation phase. "We have to be particularly careful there," says brewer Tischer, "because in order to prevent alcohol from developing, we have to stop the fermentation process in time." Low temperatures in the fermentation tank curtail the formation of alcohol. The yeast is prevented from taking effect before the legally required 0.5% alc. vol. mark has been reached. While that calls for constant checking, it is crucial because it is the only way that the typical flavors of the beer can develop.

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